Wear of appurtenances

Found in Section 29.12 Page 278

Applies to Gender Both



Appurtenances are devices affixed to service or suspension ribbons, or worn in lieu of medals or ribbons. They are worn to denote an additional award, participation in a specific event, or some other distinguishing characteristic of an award. The following appurtenances are authorized for wear on decorations, medals, ribbons and other awards, when authorized by appropriate authority. When more than one appurtenance is worn, soldiers will ensure all devices are centered on the ribbon. (See AR 600–8–22 for additional information.)

a. Oak leaf clusters.

(1) A bronze twig of four oak leaves with three acorns on each stem is worn to denote award of second and succeeding awards of decorations (other than the Air Medal), the Army Reserve Components Achievement Medal, and unit awards. A silver oak leaf cluster is worn in lieu of five bronze oak leaf clusters. It is worn to the wearer’s right of a bronze oak leaf cluster and to the left of the “V” device. Oak leaf clusters, 5/16 inch in length, are worn on service ribbons, the suspension ribbon of miniature medals, and unit awards. Oak leaf clusters, 13/32 inch in length, are worn on the suspension ribbon of full-size medals. Oak leaf clusters 5/16 inch in length, joined together in series of two, three, and four clusters, are authorized for optional purchase and wear on service ribbons and unit award emblems. Personnel wear oak leaf clusters centered on the service ribbon and suspension ribbon, with the stems of the leaves pointing to the wearer’s right. If four oak leaf clusters are worn on the suspension ribbon on either full-size or miniature medals, the fourth one is placed above the middle one in the row of three. No more than four oak leaf clusters can be worn side-by-side on service ribbons.

(2) If the number of authorized oak leaf clusters exceeds four and will not fit on a single ribbon, a second ribbon is authorized for wear. When the second ribbon is worn, it is placed after the first ribbon; the second ribbon counts as one award. Personnel may wear no more than four oak leaf clusters on each ribbon. If the receipt of future awards reduces the number of oak leaf clusters sufficiently (that is, a silver oak leaf for five awards), personnel will remove the second ribbon and place the appropriate number of devices on a single ribbon.

b. “V” device. The “V” device is a bronze block letter, “V,” 1⁄4 inch high. It is worn to denote participation in acts of heroism involving conflict with an armed enemy. The “V” device is worn centered on the suspension ribbon and service ribbon on the Air Medal, Bronze Star Medal, Army Commendation Medal, and the Joint Service Commenda- tion Medal. Not more than one “V” device is worn on a ribbon. When worn with an oak leaf cluster or numerals, the “V” device is worn on the wearer’s right.

c. Numerals. Arabic numerals, 3/16 inch in height, are issued in lieu of a medal or ribbon for second and succeeding awards of the Air Medal, Army Reserve Components Overseas Training Ribbon, the Overseas Service Ribbon, the Multinational Force and Observers Medal (MFO), and with succeeding awards of the “M” device with the Armed Forces Reserve Medal. The ribbon denotes the first award, and numerals starting with the numeral 2 denote second and subsequent awards. The numeral worn on the NCO Professional Development Ribbon denotes the highest level of NCO development, as follows:(ribbon=the primary course; 2=basic course; 3=advanced course; 4=U.S. Army sergeants major academy course completion, or equivalent level training approved by HQDA.) The numerals are worn centered on the suspension ribbon of the medal or the ribbon. (See para i, below, for placement of a numeral with the “M” device.)

d. Clasps.

(1) The Good Conduct Medal clasp is worn on the service ribbon and suspension ribbon of the Good Conduct Medal to denote second and subsequent awards. The clasp is worn centered on the Good Conduct Medal suspension ribbon and service ribbon. The clasp of the full-size medal and service ribbon is a bar, 1⁄8 inch by 13⁄8 inches, made of bronze, silver, or gold, with loops to indicate each period of service. The clasp for the miniature medal is 1/16 inch by 5⁄8 inch. (See table 29–2 for a description of the clasps authorized for second and subsequent awards. See chap 4, AR 600–8–22, for criteria for award of the Good Conduct Medal.)

(2) The Antarctic wintered-over clasp is a clasp, with the words “Wintered Over,” that is worn centered on the suspension ribbon of the Antarctica service medal. A disk with an outline of the Antarctic Continent is worn on the service ribbon. The clasp and disc are bronze for the first winter, gold for the second winter, and silver for three or more winters.

(3) All other clasps are worn only on the suspension ribbon of the award and denote battle campaigns and service campaigns; they are not worn on the service ribbon.

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e. Service stars. The service star is a bronze or silver five-pointed star, 3/16 inch in diameter. A silver service star is worn in lieu of five bronze service stars. It is worn to the wearer’s right of a bronze service star and to the left of an arrowhead. (See AR 600–8–22 for the criteria for wear.) Service stars are worn to denote an additional award or service in a named campaign and are centered on the ribbon and suspension ribbon with one point upward. Additional service stars are worn side by side, each with one point upward. Three-sixteenths-inch service stars, joined together in a series of two, three, and four stars, are authorized for optional purchase and wear on ribbons. The bronze service star is affixed to the parachutist badge and the military free fall parachutist badge to denote participation in a combat parachute jump.

f. Arrowhead. The arrowhead is a bronze replica of an Indian arrowhead, 1⁄4 inch high. It denotes participation in a combat parachute jump, combat glider landing, or an amphibious assault landing while assigned or attached as a member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission. It is worn on the suspension ribbon and service ribbon of the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign, and World War II Campaign medals; the Korean Service and Vietnam Service medals; and the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal. The arrowhead is worn with the point facing upward, and is worn to the wearer’s right of all service stars. Only one arrowhead is worn on any ribbon.

g. Berlin Airlift device. The Berlin Airlift device is a miniature replica of a C-54 aircraft and is worn on the suspension and service ribbons of the Army of Occupation Medal, with the nose pointed upward at a 30-degree angle, to the wearer’s right. When the device is worn on the suspension ribbon of the medal, it is centered above the “Germany” clasp.

h. Ten-Year device. The Ten-Year device is an hourglass that is worn centered on the suspension ribbon or service ribbon of the Armed Forces Reserve Medal to denote each succeeding 10–year period in addition to, and under the same conditions as prescribed for the award of the Armed Forces Reserve Medal. If two or more devices are authorized, they are placed side-by-side. A bronze device denotes the completion of the first 10–year period (10 years); a silver device denotes completion of the second period (20 years); a gold device denotes completion of the third period (30 years), and a gold device followed by a bronze device denotes completion of the fourth period (40 years). The Ten-Year device, 11/32 inch in height, is worn on the suspension ribbon of full-size medals and on the service ribbon; the Ten-Year device, 3/16 inch in height, is worn on the suspension ribbon of miniature medals.

i. “M”device. The “M” device is a bronze letter “M” that is worn on the suspension ribbon or service ribbon of the Armed Forces Reserve Medal to denote service during a mobilization or contingency designated by the Secretary of Defense. If personnel served during more than one mobilization or contingency, a numeral is worn to the wearer’s left of the “M” device, to indicate the number of times mobilized. If worn alone, the “M” device is worn centered on the ribbon. When worn with the Ten-Year device, the “M” device is centered on the ribbon, and the Ten-Year device is worn to the wearer’s right. If a numeral is worn, it is placed on the ribbon to the wearer’s left, with the “M” device in the center and the Ten-Year device to the wearer’s right.